Gardens in England (South-East):

The gardens, descriped below we find principally in the counties:
Surrey, Sussex en Kent.


Click on the name of the garden for entering the description directly.


1. Cabbages and Kings Garden.
2. Clinton Lodge.
3. Sissinghurst Castle Gardens.
4. Wisley Gardens.
5. Leeds Castle Park & Gardens.
6. Merriments Gardens.
7. Nymans Gardens.
8. Hever Castle & Gardens.
9. Goodnestone Park Gardens.
10. Great Dixter.
11. Pashley Manor Gardens.
12. Wakehurst Place.
13. Penshurst Place and Gardens.
14. Hailsham Grange.
15. Town Place.
16. Nettlestead Place.
17. Finchcocks Musical Museum.
18. Charts Edge Garden.
19. Great Comp Garden.
20. West Dean Gardens.
21. Parham House & Gardens.


1. Cabbages and Kings Garden


This garden is designed by Mrs. Ryl Nowell, landscape architect and garden designer.
Thanks to here you can see, what you can reach with a rather small garden.
The result is really amazing. Visitors are coming from all over the world.
Meanwhile she designed gardens for a Royal, a Prime Minister
and many well known personalities.
The change-over from the garden to the surrounding landscape
is harmonious. Soft colours give this an extra accent.
Closer to the house the colours will be more sharp.
In one of the barns there is a permanent exposition of garden-designs.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Cabbages and Kings

Click on an image to enlarge.





2. Clinton Lodge Garden


The house belonging to this garden is at the time of
King Charles I and King Charles II.
Nowadays the house belongs to Mr. and Mrs. Collum.
Around the centuries old Georgian House they created a formal and romantic garden.
The garden is separated by walls and hedges in rooms.
There is a copy of a 17th century herb garden, a canal garden, a wild flower garden,
double herbaceous borders and many old-fashioned English roses.
Also the rambler roses will have your attention.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Clinton Lodge Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Clinton Lodge.



3. Sissinghurst Castle Gardens


The word Castle in the name of this garden is a little bit overdone
for this most famous garden of England.
In the garden is a tower, from where you have a beautiful view over
the garden and the surrounding landscape.
From here you can also see, the garden is divided by hedges of yew in smaller gardens.
Everything is very well-kept by the "National Trust".
In 1930 Victoria Sackville-West and her husband Harold Nicholsen
bought the garden. After restoring the house they started the design of the garden.
The result was a garden with an enormous attractive power.
They created a romantic garden, a cottage garden,
a white garden and a rose garden.
The herb garden and the orchard with rambles roses are beautiful.
The "National Trust" took over the gardens in 1967.
Because of the big interests of this garden it could be possible
you have to buy "Timed tickets". With that ticket you can enter the garden
in between of the indicated times.
Inside the garden you can stay as long as you want.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Sissinghurst Castle Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Sissinghurst Castle Gardens.



4. Wisley Gardens


This is the garden of the "Royal Horticultural Society".
It is called an educative garden but it is more than that.
The garden covers 240 acres and offer you a fascinating blend of the beautiful
with practical and innovative design and cultivation techniques.
The history is going back about one century.
At that time George Wilson, who tenured an executive function at the RHS,
bought a ground of about 12 acres.
His "wild garden" became well-known for miles around.
After his death the country-seat was bought by Sir Thomas Hanbury,
who granted the complex in 1903 to the "Royal Horticultural Society".
The planting of the garden is in such a way, visitors can learn about it.
Many plants are labeled. You can be advised about gardening.
Starting gardeners will be accompanied and there is many research.
About the gardens we see in Wisley a walled garden, a famous rock garden,
a water garden, a mediterrainian garden, a formel garden and a heather garden.
In the greenhouses many flowering plants are shown.
Wisley can be proud of the greatest collection of plant related books.
The shop is combined with a giftshop.
Next to is we see the garden centre with many novelties.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Wisley Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum RHS Garden Wisley.



5. Leeds Castle Park & Gardens


The castle has been built on 2 islands in a lake,
in the centre of a wide landscape.
The whole complex covers 500 acres of glorious grounds surrounding the castle and its moat.
The oldest part is at the 12th century, when a Normandy castle was built.
The castle is one of the most beautiful of England.
One of the occupants was Henry VIII.
The garden is at a separated part of the complex behind the castle.
This "Culpepper Garden" was designed by the garden-architect Russel Page.
The lay-out started at 1980 and is situated on a slope
with a nice view on the landscape opposite the garden.
A part of the garden consist many roses, combined with perennials.
In the old greenhouses we see many flowering plants.
A big aviary can be seen in a rather new garden.
A visit worth is the maze with a spectacular cave in the centre.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Leeds Castle

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Leeds Castle.



6. Merriments Gardens


Merriments Gardens is a rather new garden but with a great potency.
The planting is risky, unusual combinations, shrubs with special leaf-effects
and exotic trees makes the garden famous in a short time.
There is a rich planting of pastel colours around an old garden seat using Foxgloves,
Geraniums, Roses, Sweet Rocket and other cottage garden plants.
Very special is the "Golden border" and the "Orange border".
The tropical garden is new since 2002.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Merriments Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.





7. Nymans Gardens


Thanks to three generations of the Messel family this "National Trust" garden
is one of the most important gardens of Sussex.
In 1890 Ludwig Messel bought the Nymans estate and the Regency House.
Starting at 1895 the lay-out of the gardens began.
One of the most important projects was the creation of the pinetum.
About 1930 the garden was really great and regularly opened to the public.
The second world war was a disaster for the garden.
There was no upkeeping and in 1947 the house burned down.
Later on the restoration was started and the house was rebuilt partially.
With David Masters as head-gardener the rose garden was replanted with old roses.
Nowadays the garden has an international and historic collection of plants.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Nymans Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.





8. Hever Castle & Gardens


The oldest part of the castle dates back to the end of the 13th century.
At that time it was a strenght farm with inner court surrounded by a canal.
Twohundred years later on the family Bullen built a Tudor house
within the walls of the complex.
In 1505 Sir Tomas Bullen inherited the estate from his father.
His oldest daugther Mary was the mistress of Henry VIII.
The jongest daughter, Anna became the wife of Henry VIII.
She became behead in the Tower Green in 1536.
It was Anna Bolijn, who brought out the split with Rome.
She was also the mother of queen Elisabeth I.
During her period many British colonies were founded.
At the end of the 16th century the castle falled into oblivion.
In 1903 a new episode started. William Waldorf was the new owner.
He restored the interior and the castle in Tudor style.
Next to the castle small houses were built in Tudor style.
Under the leadership of Joseph Cheal the gardens were created.
Next to the castle nice cutted hedges were planted in which we see a maze
and in yew a collection of chess pieces.
Further there is a big terrace with a collonade and Italian gardens with fountains.
Also cascades and caves became created and a lot of statues were put in the garden.
All in all a fascinating complex with nice gardens in an old style furnished castle.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Hever Castle & Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Hever Castle (1).
Photoalbum Hever Castle (2).



9. Goodnestone Park Gardens


The house and the garden arised in the 18th century.
The aunt of the present owners, Lord and Lady Fitzwalter
built the house and created the garden at the same time.
A lot of special trees at that time are still in the garden.
Lord en Lady Fitzwalter moved into the house in 1955. At that time the house
was neglected and the garden was in a bad condition.
After a radical restoration a garden arised which can be characterized as
an old-fashioned English garden.
There are classical borders within the shelter of the walls with many perennials.
Outside the walls there are many old roses like "Fantin Latour",
"Maigold" and "Königin von Danemark" and inside the walls
"Constance Sprey", Complicata" and "Buff Beauty".
A rock garden became created and in the park-landscape are many old trees.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Goodnestone Park Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at
Photoalbum Goodnestone Park Gardens.



10. Great Dixter


This is the garden of the well-known writer of garden books Christopher Lloyd.
The impressive old house from the 14th century was bought by his parents in 1910.
With help of the famous garden-architect Edwin Lutyens the garden became created.
The owner, Nathaniel Lloyd had an important voice in the matter.
Lutyens wanted a lot of walls and Nathaniel ideas were yews and topiary.
The ideas of Mr. Lloyd turned the scale.
The house we see in the middle of the garden. There is a beautiful sunk garden.
The orchard has a wild vegetation with bulbs in spring.
The mixed borders is a feast for the eyes.
The "Long Border", a creation of Christopher, is the mark of his skills.
Other gardens are the "Walled Garden", the Exotic Garden",
the "High Garden" and a smaller rose garden.
Characteristic for Kent are the Oasthouses, which you can see here too.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Great Dixter

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Great Dixter.



11. Pashley Manor Gardens


In the past the house was the property of the Passele family.
The family Boleyn bought the house in 1453 and it is said,
that Anna Boleyn, the second woman of Henry VIII lived here during her youth.
Sir Thomas May demolished the house in 1543 and built a house,
like we see it nowadays.
However the Gregorian facade was built in 1720.
Mr. and Mrs. James Sellick opened the gardens to the public in 1992.
The entrance to the garden is on the leftside of the house.
Via a fence, flanked by to Pope-vases you enter the next garden.
Bordered on this garden there is a Victorian greenhouse with many special plants.
From the backside of the house there is a nice view at the pond.
The gardens offer you a romantic landscape,
imaginative plantings and fine old trees, fountains, springs and large ponds.
The flowers in the gardens are mainly in pastel colours.
Not so long ago, a golden garden became created, which leads you to
some ponds, bordered by Azalea, Acer and Rhododendron.
In the garden and the landscape-park are many statues,
which give you a big impression.
At the terrace behind the house you can enjoy the English Tea's.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Pashley Manor Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.





12. Wakehurst Place


The owner of this garden is the "National Trust" but the garden will be kept by Kew Gardens.
That's why it will be called also "Kew in the Country".
It is an enormous complex of which about 29 acres is open to the public
and another 24 acres, the "Loder Valley Reserve", can be visited only by appointment.
In 1903 Gerald W.E. Loder (Lord Wakehurest) bought the country-seat and he
created the woodland gardens and the formel garden.
He planted a big collection af trees and shrubs from America, Australie,
New-Zealand and South America.
Due to favourable circumstances like a mild climate, good soil, clean air
and a relative high humanity many exotic plants can survive here.
After the death of Gerald Loder his work was continued by
Sir Henry Price, who granted the country-seat to the "Nationol Trust".
In the house you can see the "Seed Conservation Section" of Kew.
Seeds from all over the world are preserved by temperatures below 0 degrees,
so that they will stay with germinal force.
Next to the house there is a walled garden with many flowers in pastel colours.
There are some big lakes and ponds, a beautiful heather garden and alongside
the raods are many trees and shrubs.
This garden contains the national collections of birch, Hypericum, Skimmia and Nothofagus.
Some names in this garden are: Watergarden, Sir Henry Price Garden,
Rock Terraces, Pinetum, Rhododendron Walk en Bloomer's Valley.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Wakehurst Place

Click on an image to enlarge.





13. Penshurst Place and Gardens


Penshurst Place is surrouded by a picturesque countryside and an ancient parkland.
This masterpiece has been the seat of the Sidney family since 1552
and retains the warmth and character of a much-loved family home.
The first owner of the original 13th century house and estate was Sir Stephen de Penchester.
Nowadays Philip Sidney, Viscount De L'Isle, lives in this wonderful old house and garden
with his wife Isobel and their two children.
Visiting the house the most important rooms are: the Baron's Hall, the Long Gallory,
the State Dining Room, the Queen Elizabeth Room, the Tapestry Room and the Nether Gallery.
The house was often the residence for kings and dukes.
The garden is an 11-acre formal walled garden which consist since 1346.
The garden was constructed by Sir Henry Sidney.
He created the Italian Garden by shifting thousands of tons of earth
and building an ingenious system of walls and terraces.
The present garden is the creation of the First Viscount De L'Isle, who spended
since 1945 together with his wife Jacqueline more than 40 years
to restore the garden and the house.
In the garden is a mile of yew hedge, dividing the garden and orchards
into a series of small self-contained garden rooms, each with its own style and character.
There is a Flag Garden, an Italian Garden, a Nut Garden, a Magnolia Garden,
a Paeonie Garden, a Paved Garden and more other gardens.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Penshurst Place and Gardens.

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Penshurst Place & Gardens.



14. Hailsham Grange


Around a former early 18th century vicarage a nice garden is
created by Mr. Noel Thompson.
A series of garden rooms has been created by using Box, Hornbeam and Yew hedging.
Each garden room has his own colour-theme.
The centre of the garden is the summer-house from where
you have can look in several gardens with on one side the adjacent church.
The colour combinations in cream, apricot and yellow are very-well choosen.
Also the colour combinations of leaves are impressive.
Nice vistas and stutues gives the garden a stylish impression.
Mr. Thompson has also the possibility for Bed and Breakfast.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Hailsham Grange

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Hailsham Grange.



15. Town Place


The garden from Mr.and Mrs. McGrath at Freshfield is a rather new garden.
In a very short time they realized a complete garden with a lot of variation
and the garden will be extended more and more.
In the garden of more than 3 acres are two rose gardens: one with climbing and floribunda roses
and one with roses from the famous David Austin.
The hedges are from striped conifers, two colour beeches or combined.
There is a magnificent view from the pond at the 17th. century house.
Further there is a long border, a hornbeam walk, a potager, a herb garden and a pond.
New for 2006 are a border with grasses and late flowering perennials.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Town Place

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Town Place.



16. Nettlestead Place


When you pass the early 14th century Gatehouse,
you enter an avenue of Irish Yews that leads to the courtyard of Nettlestead Place.
Nettlestead Place is a Manor House rebuilt in the 13th century.
This plantsman's garden consists 7 acres.
The gardens are on different levels and the various rooms are surrounded by
Kentish ragstone walls, Yew, Thuja, Beech, and Box hedges.
The house and gardens are situated at a bank of the river Medway.
On the East side of the house is an 80 metre long terraced gravel garden.
This garden is planted with rock plants and dwarf bulbs.
In the big sunken garden is a pond with many tender plants.
A big collection of plants with many rare shrubs are planted over the whole garden.
A new woodland garden with more than 30 differents maples can be find beyond the "Glen Garden".
It's a fascinating garden in a shelving landscape.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Nettlestead Place

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Nettlestead Place.



17. Finchcocks Musical Museum


Finchcocks is a fine early Georgian manor in a beautiful setting.
The present house was built in 1725.
Despite having changed many times, most of its original features retains.
Including the parkland in the front Finchcocks meets 13 acres.
The garden is fully restored with wide lawns, shrub borders,
an orchard for wild flowers and a beautiful walled garden which is used for events.
There are extensive views over the Kentish landscape , the farmland and the hop-gardens.
In 1970 Finchcocks was bought by Richard Burnett, a concert pianist.
He started to collect old keybaords and now he has more than 100 antique instruments like
chamber organs, virginals, harpsichords, clavichords and a wide range of early pianos.
40 Of them are fully restored and can be played.
Often during the visits there is a concert.
There is also a collection of musical pictures and prints.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Finchcocks Musical Museum

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Finchcocks Musical Museum.



18. Charts Edge Garden


This 10 acre garden from Mr. and Mrs. Bigwood at Westerham
is spectacular with many varieties and unusual plants.
After a thorough restoration and divers enlargements
you can see a garden with many features such as:
An innovative rainbow border flanking the rill garden,
a magnificent display of Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Camellias and Magnolias.
a Victorian Folly, a terraced water garden and cascades.
Large mixed and herbaceous borders, a sculpture trail,
a bog garden, exotic garden and rock garden with over 150 varieties.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Charts Edge Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Fotoalbum Charts Edge Garden.



19. Great Comp Garden


Set in the heart of the Garden of England and surrounding a 17th century house,
Great Comp Garden is the delightful creation of Roderick and Joy Cameron
since moving to Great Comp in 1957.
The gardens are now run by the Curator William Dyson, assisted by two full time gardeners,
2 part time gardeners and a small team of volunteers.
Surrounding an early 17th Century Manor the garden extends to 7 acres,
with many beautiful and rare shrubs, perennials and other hardy and half hardy plants.
This remarkable Kent Garden is a veritable plantsman's paradise.
The year begins with Snowflakes and Helleborus followed by Magnolias, Azaleas and Rhododendrons.
Summer brings a wealth of colourful, rare and exotic shrubs and perennials, especially Salvias.
These unusual and long flowering plants are particularly well represented at
Great Comp with their display extending between May and October.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Great Comp Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Great Comp Garden.



20. West Dean Gardens


West Dean Gardens, nestling in the South Downs National Park, is a place of tranquillity and beauty.
Is is a nineteenth century Gothic house, designed by James Wyatt,
with a twentieth century Arts and Crafts garden, designed by Harold Peto in 1911.
In the restored walled kitchen garden are some of the finest Victorian glasshouses in the country,
further rustic summerhouses, a 300ft Edwardian pergola, ornamental borders
and a rustic stream with pond contrast with over 200 varieties of carefully trained fruit trees,
rows of vegetables and exotic flowers and produce behind glass.
For the more active a 2 and a half mile circular walk offers breathtaking views
of the estate and its fine flint house and parkland setting.
The gardens has its own restaurant serving hot and cold snacks
and lunches and shop selling imaginative gifts and jewellery.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

West Dean Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum West Dean Gardens.



21. PArham House & Gardens


Parham House was originally owned by the Monastery of Westminster.
In 1577 the foundation stone of the present house was laid by Sir Thomas's two-and-a-half year old grandson.
In 1922 Parham Park was purchased by Clive Pearson and his wife Alicia.
In 1948, after the Second World War Mr and Mrs Pearson opened Parham to the public
and were amongst the first to show their house regularly in the post-war years.
They were followed in this tradition by their eldest daughter, Veronica Tritton, who devoted her life to Parham.
Mr and Mrs Pearson spent more than 40 years carefully restoring Parham and
filling it with a sensitively chosen collection of beautiful furniture, paintings and textiles,
also acquiring items originally in the house.
The range of portraits is especially notable.
There are many rugs and carpets and a particularly important collection of early needlework.
Mr and Mrs Pearson were also responsible for the form of the gardens seen at Parham today.
The four-acre walled garden includes a Wendy House and an apple orchard.
Its large mixed borders and greenhouses are principally devoted to the growing of flowers and plants for the house.
Mrs Pearson began the tradition of making arrangements to harmonise with the colours in the rooms.
The 18th century Pleasure Grounds extend to seven acres and include a lake,
many specimen trees and spring bulbs, swings and a brick and turf maze.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Parham House & Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



Voor meer foto's kijk op:
Photoalbum Parham House & Gardens.