Gardens in England (South):

The gardens, descriped below we find principally in the counties:
Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire, Hampshire, Berkshire and the island Wight.


Click on the name for a direct connection to the garden.


1. Cliveden.
2. Abbotsbury Sub-Tropical Garden.
3. Barrington Court.
4. Compton Acres.
5. Tintinhull Garden.
6. Longstock Park Water Garden.
7. Ventnor Botanic Garden.
8. Mottisfont Abbey.
9. Furzey Gardens.
10. Cranborne Manor Gardens.
11. East Lambrook Manor.
12. Spinners.
13. Iford Manor Gardens.
14. Englefield House & Garden.
15. Bramdean House.
16. West Silchester Hall.
17. West Green House Gardens.
18. Heale Gardens.
19. Mapperton Gardens.
20. Forde Abbey and Gardens.
21. Knoll Gardens.
22. Athelhampton House & Gardens.
23. Chiffchaffs.
24. Spring Pond Garden.
25. The Manor House Upton Grey.
26. Osborne House.
27. Hambledon House Gardens.
28. Farleigh House.


1. Cliveden


The first house was built in 1666 by the 2nd Duke of Buckingham.
It has twice been destroyed by fire and built up by the Duke of Sutherland in 1850
The majestic building in Italian style we see today is from the architect Charles Barry,
it is a real masterpiece.
The garden is from The "National Trust" and was created about 1730.
From the balustrate you have a magnificent view over the formal part
of the garden with the river Thames at the background.
Other gardens are the Japanese water-garden, the "Long Walk"
with nice statues and many topiary.
There is more to see in this great estate. Convince yourself.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Cliveden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Cliveden 2004.



2. Abbotsbury Sub-Tropical Garden


This garden is situated near to the coast, very well protected against
the sometimes stormy winds from the north.
The garden was established in 1765 by the first Countess of Ilchester.
since that time the garden became renewed by Lady Teresa Agnew
and her chief-gardener into a into a magnificent
7 hectares garden filled with rare and exotic plants from all over the world.
Nowadays it is a mixture of formal and informal gardens with
a walled garden, walks and spectacular woodland valley views.
Also we see here many Rhododendrons, Hydrangeas,
Eucalyptus, roses and palms, sometimes more than 100 years old.
It is a garden with paradiciacal impressions in which
peacocks and pheasants are walking free in the garden.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Abbotsbury Sub-Tropical Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens 2006.



3. Barrington Court


The 16th century house was restored in the years 1920.
At that time the history of the gardens began.
Colonel Lyle made a plan and he got help by the famous Gertrud Jykell.
Not so long afterwards the garden became a "National Trust" garden.
After the death of the colonel his wife took care, during the 2e world war
the garden was kept very well.
The female head-gardener Chris Middleton guaranteed an excellent plantingscheme.
There are now six walled areas with beds, borders, Buxus hedges, climbers and lawns.
The garden includes the beautiful White Garden, the Iris Garden and the Lily Garden.
In the house we see Stuart interiors in a lot of showrooms.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Barrington Court

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Barrington Court.



4. Compton Acres


This garden, not far from Bournemouth,
is the creation of Mr. Thomas William Simpson.
During the first world war he made a plan for a garden
which should consist of several divisions.
De garden should be surrounded by hedges, walls and trees.
In this manner a Roman garden, a header-garden, an Italian garden.
a Spanisch water-garden and an Egyptian garden became created.
During the second world war the bottem was fallen out of the garden.
In 1950 the complex was bought by Mr. Beard and the reconstruction
of the garden started with as a result the re-opening in 1952.
The Italian garden with the many statues is really great to see.
Also the Japanese garden with the famous cranes is a beauty.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Compton Acres

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Compton Acres 1989.



5. Tintinhull House


The first lay-out of this garden belonging to a 17th century house was done by Dr. Price.
At the beginning of the 20th century he was the founder.
In 1933 Captain and Mrs. Reiss bought the complex and
changed the garden in the present-day situation.
In 1954 they donated the garden to the "National Trust".
After that the famous English garden-designer Penelope Hobhouse
lived for 14 years in the house and she renewed some parts of the garden.
She wrote many books with images of this garden.
Within the fixed lines of the garden we see a romantic planting
with old roses and many perennials.
Smaller gardens became created like the "Eagle Court",
the "Middle Court", the "Fountain Garden" and the "Cedar Court".
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Tintinhull House

CClick on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Tintinhull House 1990.



6. Longstock Park Water Garden.


The garden you see now is the creation of Mr. John Spedan Lewis.
He acquired the estate in 1946 and with help of the botanist
Terry Jones he began to redevelop the garden.
He trebled the garden in size, added many details to the main lake
and created new small islands connected by small bridges.
All the work had to be done by hand,
so it took ten years, before the project was completed.
Looking at the garden now, it's just like a delta of the river Test.
At the time of Mr. Lewis the garden was strickly privat.
Nowadays the garden sometimes will be opened to the public.
When you are in the garden, you feel like you are in the paradise.
The garden is an absolute beauty. Small paths and bridges bring you
from the one peninsula to the other and everywhere there is
an exciting view at the water-plants.
In the water we see more than 48 different kinds of water-lilies.
Mr. Stone, the present head-gardener continuously add new
plants to his assortment.
By the International Waterlily Society
this garden has been voted as "the finest water garden in the world."
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Longstock Park Water Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Longstock Park Water Gardens 2015.



7. Ventnor Botanic Garden.


This garden at the island of Wight has a big collection
of tropical and sub-tropical plants.
The protection against stormy winds by Escallania and Quercus ilex
means we have to do with very mild temperatures.
In the garden we see sections with plants from
Australia, Mexico and from Africa.
They have a lot of attention at the presentation of the plants.
In the garden there is a "Medical Garden" with plants from all over the world.
The plants in the greenhouses are divided in climate-zones.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Ventnor Botanic Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Ventnor Botanic Garden 2009.
Photoalbum Ventnor Botanic Garden 2015.



8. Mottisfont Abbey.


The oldest dates from Mottisfont are about the year 1200. Till 1536 it was an abbey.
At that time William Lord Sandys bought the complex alongside the river Test.
During e few centuries it was very quiet and in the 19th century
many majestic trees were planted.
Also at that time a "Kitchen Garden" became created.
Very well-known among these old trees is the "Great Plane",
a plane-tree with trunk-girth about 12 meters.
Next to the abbey there is a garden with cutted Buxus, planted with lavender.
A nice area with the old trees lead you to the walled garden, filled with roses.
The collection is very well-known because of the fact that Graham Thomas,
an expert in roses and writer of books about roses,
has his valuable collection of old roses in this garden since 1972.
The walled gardens containing "The National Collection of old-fashioned roses".
He cultivated in the meantime many new roses, with are very famous.
Meanwhile there are two walled gardens in which you can find
besides the old roses also the more modern roses.
This means that the flowering-time of the roses is extended substantial.
Besides the roses we see also perennials and there is a dubble border.
The garden is a recommandation for lovers of roses and thanks to
the "National Trust" the garden is in a perfect condition.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Mottisfont Abbey

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Mottisfont Abbey Gardens 2006.



9. Furzey Gardens.


The beginning of this garden is in the year 1922.
At that time the gardens became created and the lay-out started.
The house, the "Forest Cottage" should be from the 16th century.
Of particular interest is the original fireback and bread oven.
There are beautiful banks of Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Camelias.
The water garden is beautiful and you can see many ferns.
In the garden is also an important collection of heather.
Eye-catchers are the Embotriums (flaming Chilean Fire trees) and
the six different Eucryphia's (trees with white flowers in summer).
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Furzey Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.





10. Cranborne Manor Gardens.


The history of this hous is going back till the year 1207.
At that time King John stayed here during the hunt.
The house became renovated and wings and towers were built.
Robert Cecil, the first Earl of Salisbury arranged as garden-architect
John Tradescant the Elder. This architect travelled a lot to collect plants
from all over the world.
The civil war and the 18th century were a disaster for the complex.
At the beginning of the 20th century Cranborne manor became renovated fully.
The restoration was in Victorian style. Also the gardens became renewed
according to the drawings of John Tradescant the Elder.
The water came from the river Crane, where the name Cranborne is coming from.
Via two majestic towers you enter the inner court.
The present Marquess and Marchioness of Salisbury renewed some parts of the garden.
In the "Mount Garden" we see many old roses, bulbs and perennials,
surrounded by Buxus and lavender.
The borders at the "South Court" are recovered to the old style.
The "North Court" behind the house is a beautiful white garden.
Further there is a vegetable-garden, a grand hedge of yew with vistas
over the pasture-lands, a "Knotgarden" and many Roses and Clematis.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Cranborne Manor Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Cranborne Manor Gardens 2006.



11. East Lambrook Manor.


Margery Fish bought this house with a neglected garden in 1938.
The famous Margery created gardens to which anyone could relate.
She wrote many books like: "A Flower For Every Day", "An All The Year Garden",
"Cottage Garden Flowers" and "Gardening In The Shade".
After her death in 1969 she left a really brilliant garden in cottage style.
We see many ground-covering plants in this garden.
The new owner Mrs. Andrew Norton and her head-gardener Mark Stainer
made it their task, to keep the garden for the posterity and they succeeded very well.
The garden is divided in several cottage-gardens, all with their own name.
There is a "Silver Garden", a "White Garden", the "Long Border",
the "Herb Garden" and some other gardens.
The old house, dating from 1470 is covered with climbing plants.
In the garden are more than 6000 species of plants.
The National Collection of Geraniums you can find here.
There are more than 180 different ones, 70 sorts of hybrides
and 120 cultivars of them in this garden.
Also the collection of Helleborus is imporant.
In the nursery are many perennials with of course geraniums.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

East Lambrook Manor

Click on an image to enlarge.





12. Spinners.


This rather young garden was created by the owners
Mrs. and Mr. Chappell between 1961 and 1981.
Situated next to the New Forest they created their paradise
at a small dilapidated house.
Thanks to well-choosen thinning out of the wood and new planting
a new garden was created with many Rhododendrons, Azaleas
Helleborus, combined with a good collection of perennials like
primroses, Geranium, Iris and Mecanopsis.
Combined with the existing big trees and planting of Japanese Acer
and Eucalyptus the garden looks very full-grown.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Spinners

Click on an image to enlarge.





13. Iford Manor Gardens.


Near to Bradford-on-Avon we find the small village of Iford.
The garden with the same name once belonged to Harold Peto,
who carried out his ideas about the Renaissance very emphatic.
Harold Peto, an architect and landscape gardener worked here from 1899 to 1933.
The garden is situated against a hill and by the gradual built-up of the garden
a complex arised with many buildings, walls and statues,
which gives the garden an exotic impression.
On the steep slopes there are terraces linked by steps, fountains, loggias, urns and figures.
There are many trees, shrubs and flowers with beautifully planted containers.
Italian spheres and British planting are combined harmonious.
From the terraces there is a beautiful view over the surrounding landscape
with the bridge over the river Frome as eye-catcher.
The Peto garden won the Historic Houses Association/Christie's 1998 Garden of the Year Award.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Iford Manor Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Iford Manor 1992.



14. Englefield House & Garden.


Englefield House is an impressive Tudor manor, situated on a hill.
From this hill you have a beautiful view over the surrounding landscape.
The first history of the house is from the 9th century.
During the centuries there were many owners and there were several rebuildings.
The present owners are the Benyon family.
Walking through the house you see on the left and right side nice furnished rooms.
In the seven acre garden are many beautiful old trees
and the garden is surrounded by a deer park.
Thanks to a Ha-Ha the deers can not enter the garden.
The formal garden was laid out in the 17th century and
the terraces and stone staircases were built in 1860.
The woodland and water garden on the hill above the house was designed and planted in 1936.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Englefield House & Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.




15. Bramdean House.


In front of the 18th century mellow brick house is an enormous yew and box hedge.
It is a beautiful 5 acre garden.
The house and the garden were developed at the same time.
Mrs. Feilden, the mother of the present owner started to divide the garden again in 1940.
At present the garden will be developed more and more by the owner
Mrs. Victoria Wakefield and her headgardener Derek Wadsworth.
Behind the house are famous mirror-image herbaceous borders.
At the end of the borders is a vista on the "Apple House" with a
clock-mechanism of more than 100 years old.
In the garden are also a "Kitchen Garden", a "Croquet Lawn",
a "Lady's Walk" and a "Summer House Walk".
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Bramdean House


Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Bramdean House 2009.



16. West Silchester Hall.


Mrs. Jenny Jowett is the owner of this garden.
She has painted professionally for 30 years.
Her specialisme is botanical illustrations and she enjoys the freedom of landscape.
Most of her paintings are in watercolor and many are inspired by her garden.
In the 1 1/2 acre garden are herbaceous borders,
Rhododendrons, and many acid loving plants.
There is a small pond, a bog garden and a kitchen garden.
In her studio are many paintings to see and for sale.
No website available.
Visit on appointment. Tel. (44)-118-9700278.

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum West Silchester Hall.



17. West Green House Gardens.


Since 1993 this garden is restored by Miss Marylyn Abbott.
Nowadays the garden looks very spectacular and
in the "Britainís Good Garden Guide" the garden is rated with two stars.
In the formal walled garden are uniquely coloured plant combinations.
There is a Paradise Water Garden with its dancing fountains and moated trees,
a potager, many topiary of box and yew and next to the walled garden is a natural pond.
Refreshments can be used in the "Alice in Wonderland Garden".
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

West Green House Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum West Green House Gardens.



18. Heale Gardens.


The original building is the western end of the house and was built by Sir William Greene
for his daughter and son-in-law in 1553 as a wedding present.
The house was enlarged several times till a fire in 1835 reduced the house to a third.
In 1894 Louis Greville enlarged the house again to the present situation.
The unique and wonderful legacy was created by Lady Anne Rasch and during 35 years
until she died in 1995 this garden was here creation.
She made this garden to an "Oldfashioned English Garden".
Visiting this eight-acre garden you can find old English roses,
herbaceous borders and in the walled garden
there is a tunnel theme with a variety of climbing plants such as apple trees.
There are also several old ponds and a brook is meandering through the garden.
An eastern part of the garden was created by some Japanese gardeners.
After the death of Anne Rasch Guy Rasch married Frances Hulse in 1996 and
with the benefit of some gardeners in her own family, she brought a new perspective
to the garden introducing modern design, colour and style.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Heale Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.





19. Mapperton Gardens.


Mapperton Gardens is a garden situated in a valley.
The owners are the Earl and Countess of Sandwich.
Entering the house you should not expect such a nice garden behind the house.
In May 2006 the house is choosen by "country Life" to "The Nationís Finest Manor House".
This Manor House dates from rthe 16th century.
From the house you can see the garden splitted into three levels.
The levels are separated by terraces.
In the first level are old roses, Clematis and Wisteria.
The seconds level has a mediterranian Italian garden with a beautiful fountain.
There is more water, statues adn ornaments.
The fishing ponds are surrounded by hedges with statues.
De visvijvers zijn omzoomd door taxushagen waarin zich standbeelden bevinden.
The third level is an arboretum with a nice overflow the the surrounding meadows.
For painters and photografers the garden is a source of inspiration.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Mapperton Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



for more images look at:
Photoalbum Mapperton Gardens 2006.



20. Forde Abbey and Gardens.


Forde Abbey is situated as a pearl in a beautiful landscape.
This former Cistercian monastery with its beautiful gardens has more than 900 years history.
The monastery still exists and after a few rebuildings it is now a beautiful Country House.
The gardens around the house are from the 18th. century.
There are herbacious borders, many old trees and several lakes.
In the Bog Garden are many Asiatic primroses, mecanopsis and other moisture loving plants.
A nursery in the Kitchen Garden has many special plants.
In the 18th. century the Gwyn family created the landscape garden.
The lawn, the walls are also from that time and the original pond became changed at that time.
Smaller gardens were created by planting yew hedges.
Later on the Evans family created a victorian garden with rhododendrons and beautiful trees.
The house and the gardens are an impressive historic complex.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Forde Abbey and Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Forde Abbey and Gardens 2006.



21. Knoll Gardens.


In the early 1970s Mr and Mrs John May began planting
on a semi-wooded overgrown area of scrub
alongside an existing market garden and nursery called The Knoll.
The collection of plants increased rapidly
and the garden became the name of Wimborne Botanic Garden.
Nowadays many trees like Eucalyptus are from that time.
In 1988 the business was switched over to Mr & Mrs Kevin Martin.
They gave the garden the present name.
In 1994 Knoll Gardens came into the care of Mr. Neil Lucas and Mr. adn Mrs. John Flude.
They brought many interesting and unusual plants in the garden.
Today Knoll a has national reputation for its ornamental grasses.
In the garden are many winding paths with after each winding a surprise.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Knoll Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Knoll Gardens 2006.



22. Athelhampton House & Gardens.


Athelhampton's history and its families covers more than a thousand years.
Athelhampton has been built for over five centuries.
Major restoration and the creation of the formal gardens
started in 1891 by Alfred Cart de Lafontaine.
This House & its estate from 160 acres
have been in private ownership for over five hundred years.
Patrick & Andrea Cooke now run Athelhampton and they have managed
much of the restoration and improvement you see today.
The Great Court, Terrace and Pavilions, the Corona, Private Garden and Lion's Mouth
are all the masterpiece of Francis Inigo Thomas.
Each year the Yew trees in the Great Court are hand cut by Patrick Cooke,
a job he has undertaken each year since he was 14.
The house and it's imposing gardens are a historical complex.
Don't forget to visit the house.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Athelhampton House & Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Athelhampton House & Gardens 2006.



23. Chiffchaffs.


Chiffchaffs is a typical cottage-garden.
The house is about 400 years old and is situated in the middle of the garden.
The garden is created by Mr & Mrs Potts. They also run the nursery next to the garden.
The garden consists of 2 parts, a woodland-garden and a cottage-garden,
which is divided is several garden-rooms, creating a special atmosphere.
You can see here nice borders, Roses and Rhododendrons.
The garden is closed.

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Chiffchaffs 2006.



24. Spring Pond Garden.


The garden at Spring Pond has been created
about the year 2000 by designer Carolyn Sheffield.
The planting has been carefully planned in coloured sections,
divided by yew and hornbeam hedges, incorporating a blue garden,
a white garden and reds and greys.
Creams, yellows and mauves are blended together.
Another bed features blues and harmonious pinks.
In addition there is a hot bed of reds, oranges and yellows.
Three ponds, a bank of wild flowers, the arboretum and exotic plants
growing in the conservatory add further interest.
Roses and clematis climbing up the flint stone wallls of the converted barn,
are additional features. Every year improvements are made.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Spring Pond Garden

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Spring Pond Garden 2009.



25. The Manor House Upton Grey.


This is the garden from Mr. and Mrs.Wallinger.
30 years ago this garden in Upton Grey, was nothing more than an unkempt jungle.
What they didn't realise when they bought the property was
that underneath the jungle were the foundations of a very special garden,
indeed one that Gertrude Jekyll had designed in 1908 for a house belonging to Charles Holme,
a leading figure in the Arts and Crafts movement.
They had very little knowledge of gardening until we came to Upton Grey;
that was soon to change with the unearthing of this important piece of garden history.
They decided to research the garden and, having discovered a full set of plans
in the Reef Point Collection at The University of California at Berkeley,
they obtained copies and set about the restoration.
What they recreated is now believed to be the most complete and authentic Jekyll garden in existence.
Now it is a living museum of Jekyll design.
The garden is now totally restored except two plants who are missing.
The best time to visit the garden is from mid May till the end of June.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

The Manor House Upton Grey

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum The Manor House Upton Grey.




26. Osborne House.


Queen Victoria and Prince Albert bought the Osborne estate on the Isle of Wight in 1845.
There they created a private home away from court life in London and Windsor.
Queen Victoria used Osborne for more than 50 years,
entertaining foreign royalty and visiting ministers as well as her own extensive family,
and after Prince Albertís death in 1861 she found solace there.
Many of the rooms are still filled with original furniture and works of art,
reflecting the coupleís personal tastes,
while the planting in the grounds is to Prince Albertís designs.
In keeping with the house, the terrace gardens were designed
in formal Italianate style by Cubitt and Prince Albert himself.
The walled garden has been restored as part of
the Contemporary Heritage Gardens scheme run by English Heritage.
The grounds at Osborne House are a delight
with the Victorian spirit of the garden recaptured for modern visitors.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Osborne House

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Osborne House.




27. Hambledon House Gardens.


Hambledon House is a 2 acre privat garden from Mrs. Hart Dyke.
This garden is a real plantsman paradise.
Mrs Hart Dyke has created a garden which is thick with colour all through the year.
It is the placing of plants that interests her most.
Brick and flint walls, and wonderful hedges of yew and box divide the garden into smaller areas.
It is especially interesting for its unusual trees and shrubs.
Colour, shape and form determine where plants look best: highlights include clematis, salvias,
lavender, hardy geraniums, grasses and a great choice of herbaceous plants.
A new area of planting is being developed following the necessary removal of a very old copper beech,
and for the regular visitor there is always a new project under way.
Hidden and secluded areas reveal views of village rooftops.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Hambledon House Gardens

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Hambledon House Gardens.




28. Farleigh House.


The gardens have a stylish modern design ideas from Georgina Langton.
The walled garden of Farleigh House meets 3 acres.
The whole is kept in perfect condition.
yew hedges frame the stunning views and there are regular renewals.
The borders are exuberant implanted.
There is an extensive vegetable and herb garden and a greenhouse with exotic plants.
It's all very spacious, unfussy and understated. The garden is divided into three parts.
One is a garden wiht old roses, with plants from nepeta and alchemilla around a central pool and fountain.
Another part has wild roses and some good modern sculptures
Best of all is the section with deep herbaceous borders and large pots of agapanthus.
Following a superb range of new greenhouses, planted with bougainvillea,
brugmansias, passion flowers and other delicate shrubs.
New for 2010 is a shell grotto designed by Jocelyn Hayden.
Further topiary and beautiful wrought iron railings in the garden ask for your attention.
The entire complex meets about 16 acres.
Go to the website below for opening hours and admission prices:

Farleigh House

Click on an image to enlarge.



For more images look at:
Photoalbum Farleigh House.